A Study of Lament: The Man of Sorrows

{read the rest of the series by clicking here}

Whether we are suffering because of judgment or in innocence, God’s purpose is for His glory. The greatest example of innocent suffering is Jesus, and like the sufferings of Job and Jeremiah, Jesus’ suffering is also for God’s glory.

Perhaps the greatest comfort to me in seasons of sorrow is that Jesus understands. Isaiah 53 says, “He was despised and forsaken of men, a man of sorrows and acquainted with grief… surely He has borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows.” And in Hebrews 2, the author notes that Jesus was made like us in every respect.
In the incarnation, He entered our suffering. He stepped into the sin-cursed world. In His perfection, He was more aware of things “not being right” than we are. He understood the fullness of the brokenness of our condition. He was tempted, like us.
He suffered, like us. Injustice, pain, spiritual torment. He was innocent, like Job. He wept over Jerusalem, like Jeremiah. And he was forsaken and alone, like David.
He was born, like all of us, in pain and tears. But it didn’t stop at His birth – the innocent were slaughtered as Herod sought to destroy Jesus. And so there was weeping yet again.
Then He Himself lamented for Jerusalem, longing for her to come to Him, weeping for the coming judgment, but ending with hope: “you will not see Me until you say, ‘Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord!’” There was devastation coming, but Jesus knew that one day there would be repentance, and so His lament contained hope.

But even more than identifying with our pain, Jesus shows us what the answer to our suffering is. He came down and joined our problem, but He didn’t leave it alone. He pronounced blessing and future joy for those who are mourning, but it didn’t come in the way everyone thought. He showed us that the answer to our pain isn’t a solution, but His presence. It’s not what we asked for, but it’s what we need more than anything else.
Jesus became Immanuel, so that Immanuel, God with us, can be forever. He offered His hesed, His lovingkindness, in a way that can never be lost because it is based on Jesus and not our performance. He came to free us from chains of sin that weighs us down. He came to fill our need, and to bring us to God – who is worth every pain, who makes it not about us but about His glory, which is far greater. He doesn’t take pleasure in our pain, but allows it because it results in His glory.

While He was God with us, there was a time when He was forsaken by God. Condemned and separated, He suffered the darkest night a soul has ever known. He was accounted as sinful and judged by His Father, cut off from the most intimate relationship anyone has ever known.
“The Lord was pleased to crush Him, putting Him to grief… As a result of the anguish of His soul, He will see it and be satisfied. By His knowledge the Righteous One, My Servant, will justify the many, as He will bear their iniquities.” (Isaiah 53:10-11).
It was when Jesus was forsaken that God was using Him most. Like a lament, the suffering and questioning of God turned to rejoicing for His love and mercy.
Jesus conquered the root of our suffering – our sin, and so now in lament there is a certainty of a change from sorrow to joy. There is a certainty that the sorrow will end for His children and result in great rejoicing, because there is a promise of an eternal life of knowing the Father.

Immanuel.
He came and fixed our problems, not by taking them away, but by giving us Himself in them so that we will have everything we will ever need.
Remember that, when it seems you are forsaken. He is working even then, and He will not cast off forever (Lamentations 3:31-32).

Jesus of the Scars
If we have never sought, we seek Thee now;
Thine eyes burn through the dark, our only stars;
We must have sight of thorn-pricks on Thy brow,
We must have Thee, O Jesus of the Scars.

The heavens frighten us; they are too calm;
In all the universe we have no place.
Our wounds are hurting us; where is the balm?
Lord Jesus, by Thy Scars, we claim Thy grace.

If, when the doors are shut, Thou drawest near,
Only reveal those hands, that side of Thine;
We know to-day what wounds are, have no fear,
Show us Thy Scars, we know the countersign.

The other gods were strong; but Thou wast weak;
They rode, but Thou didst stumble to a throne;
But to our wounds only God’s wounds can speak,
And not a god has wounds, but Thou alone.
– Edward Shillito

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