While Away from Csehy… (+ an exciting announcement)

I was thinking about my own admonition in my last post of taking what we learned from Csehy and what we love about Csehy and applying it where we are all the time. That paired with stalking Chamberfest as Christina posts pictures led to some thoughts of some ways those of us missing Csehy (or suffering PCD after Csehy) can use those longings to be fruitful!

– encourage others who are missing Csehy! Call/email/Skype/Facebook message each other.
– pray for those at Csehy
– pray for those away from Csehy, especially people like the Pinkhams who can’t be there because of health issues.
– play and sing hymns on your own or with your family – not just in an “I miss Csehy” sort of way, but in a way that uses those hymns you miss to worship God!
– send letters or packages to friends at Csehy (there may or may not be four sitting on my ironing board right now, addressed with names and songs, waiting for goodies).
– send a note to someone from Csehy that has made a difference in your life (whether they are there currently or not) to thank them.
– host a hymn-sing or put on a concert
– whenever you miss Csehy, spend that time praying or reading God’s Word
– learn new pieces of music
– start a Bible study
– blog or share on Facebook about what God taught you at or through Csehy
– pray for people when you see  pictures of them at Csehy
– listen to the chapel messages when they’re posted online
– teach music to others
– brush up on your music theory
– find ways you can serve at church and your community, with music or without

And finally…
Read my eBook, The Christian Musician when it’s launched on August 2nd (Lord willing… there’s still a bit of editing and then formatting to do, but that’s my goal!).
From the preface:

My life as a professional musician lasted a week and a day. I am not a world-class musician; I am not even at a graduate level. But I had questions about how playing instrumental, secular music can glorify God – especially practicing for long hours. If I was going to invest so much time and effort into music, it was going to have to be worth it in eternity. When you hear recordings of yourself and all you can think about is how awful you are, then your motivation has to be greater than simply loving music. That was something I always knew. But when I was ready to give up, I began asking questions that meant taking “I play music to glorify God” from an idea to a reality.

I pray that what follows will provide encouragement and food for thought for fellow Christian musicians who are striving to make craft captive to obedience to Christ.

I will discuss the purpose of music, life lessons music teaches us, grace, pride, identity, worship, service, and the way music can speak to us in and of itself.  My focus is going to be secular, instrumental music, though I will touch on vocal and church music. While these thoughts center on musicianship, they may be applied to any pursuit requiring practice and skill, be it writing, dancing, nursing, or engineering.

…and that’s the end of my shameless plug.

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From the Archives: Dear Csehy

{Chamberfest started on Sunday, and Csehy the Sunday after. Meanwhile we prepare to move across the ocean and entertain a squealing, active baby on the opposite coast. In some ways being so far away and knowing how impossible getting there this year was makes it not-so-bad to be away. But then James plays “The Love of God” for prelude at Nat’s wedding, and we sing “This is My Father’s World” at church and memories flood back – Mr. Haynes leading singtime, Dr. Hsu’s rendition of Father’s World, Mr. P teaching on it in chapel… or I remember that it’s Mr. Haynes’s last year, and then it’s hard. I certainly miss the music, and the frisbee, but the people and the faith is what makes me hope and pray we’ll be back some day. In the meantime, these are my leaving thoughts from Csehy last year, which still hold true today}

Dear Csehy,

I have so many thoughts and words swirling around in my head that I don’t know where to begin. I have so much I want to say – so much thanks, so many memories, so many prayers.
As I write this I have no assurance of ever being at Csehy again. We hope and we dream, and perhaps someday there will be little Dunn staff children while their daddy speaks in chapel or mommy works in the office. Or perhaps in the faraway someday we’ll be head counselors, or be in charge of the Csehy Place. God alone knows who of you I’ll see again on earth, and when that will be. But even while we’re apart, while the pain of being away from such a sweet place is tender in our hearts, we can still encourage one another across the miles, while we must be away for a time.

For seven summers now, Csehy has been a haven for me. It’s been a place where I have grown spiritually, relationally, and musically. I think of the fourteen-year-old me that arrived at Csehy in 2008, shy of everyone and a beginner on the oboe, and how I’ve changed so much since that day. A lot of that is because of Csehy, and how God has used it in my life. There were people that first year, and every year since, who came alongside me and were patient with me – Mr. Stith, Mrs. Rawleigh, and Mrs. Harding especially. There were also people who reached out to make me feel welcome, and even though I was young and inexperienced and awkward, you cared about me and were a friend to me. It took me a while to let some of you do that – but I was missing out. Some of you seemed like giants to me then, and many of you are now good friends.
Now having been an older camper who understands a lot more musically (and who was one of those crazy composition majors – and we’re not incredibly smart, just stressed out and a little insane), I understand you more. To younger campers, we don’t think we’re better than you, and we don’t judge you by your ability. We’ve just had longer to grow. We were once in your shoes, and we haven’t by any means arrived – we have far to go as well. Your musicality or lack thereof doesn’t change our desire to be your friend, to encourage you. We don’t want to be giants to you, but older siblings and friends.

The more I think about it, the more I realize Csehy was a haven to me because of the people I chose to be with. We spoke of and cared about the things of the Lord. We laughed a lot, and I’m sure at times were childish and immature. But the best times were when we had our Bibles open or were talking about the things God had done. It was rich spiritually, and though the musical side of it was good (as was Frisbee), that was what always drew me back. It was what drove every lesson with Mrs. Rawleigh, and often we talked more of God than of music. How ever long I was there for, I could rest from trials of real life and bask in fellowship and teaching.
When I was too old to be a camper any more, I applied to be a counselor in 2013, wanting to invest in others even as I had been invested in by my counselors. And even though I couldn’t be there very long this year (2014) and meet all of you, there’s still much I long to say to everyone who has ever been at Csehy.

My fellows in the bubble, God isn’t just a section of your life or of your summer. At Csehy, we put Him in music and Frisbee, at the start and end of each day. Csehy is a place for friends and fun, but it’s about so much more than that. I rejoiced at how many times what Csehy really is about was driven home: if you’re not right with God, your conductor won’t mind you missing band/orchestra/choir if you’re getting right with Him. He is far more important than the concert. We hear it. We listen. We nod. But for many of you, that’s not your lifestyle at home, or your heart attitude, even at Csehy. You know enough Christian lingo to cover up the state of your heart while you’re at Csehy. You may even have a testimony to share with your hall. But that only makes it worse, because we can only help those who know they’re sick and hurting, even if we can see behind your mask – which we often can. The blank stares during devos or chapel , the meandering through the halls of practice rooms when you should be doing something else, and the way you interact with authority and other campers gives away your heart.
Some of you don’t understand how all-encompassing His word or His call on your life is. I want you to know that. I want you to know that it effects how you treat your parents and your siblings. How you dress (purple isn’t just rules at Csehy. There are matters of the heart behind it!). How you think of and treat the opposite gender. How you move towards marriage someday. How we talk about everything. How your life and salvation is not about you, but about Him – He saved you for His glory more than for your own gain – do you love Him for who He is, or just what He’s done for you? How He is so awesome and great that our every thought and conversation could be on Him and we’d never tire – so why don’t we spend all our time together focused on Him? Why do we deteriorate into surface level friendships when we could have so much?

When we forget Him in what we do, we lose the depth that life can have and Csehy becomes just a place of fun instead of being all it can be. Csehy is a safe place. Joy. Rest. A place to be challenged, equipped, prepared, loved – loving one another as Jesus said to.
That’s why we all find it so hard to leave. Nowhere have I been unconditionally loved by so many, encouraged by so many, or challenged by so many as I have at Csehy. Many of my closest friendships have been made or deepened at Csehy. When we leave, we’re leaving days full of constant fellowship, solid teaching, and fun rooted in love for one another and love for God. The difficulty we have adjusting back to normal life proves how good Csehy is.
And yet, Csehy is a place to be equipped and then be sent out. Last year as all the counselors prepared to leave, Mr. Haynes likened it to a dandelion spreading. We were all together for a time, and then the wind was blowing and we were all being driven to our own places, to be planted there, growing and spreading in the places we live. The Csehy spirit isn’t just for Csehy. It’s something that we can bring everywhere, changing our families, churches, and communities, as we love and encourage people at home like we did at Csehy.

Some of us will be back at Csehy next summer, perhaps full of stories of how God worked through us because of what we learned at Csehy. I’m reminded of the parable of the talents. Csehy is like a talent we’ve been given, and if we go home and all we can think about is being back at Csehy, then we’re burying the talent instead of investing it like the faithful servants did (Matthew 25:14-30).
Some of us are called to keep returning. Others are not. But whichever it is for me, whether that door is closed for ever or for a few years, not being at Csehy doesn’t equate forever goodbyes or forgetting what Csehy was or not ever being with members of that family again. I thought – or rather felt – like it did for a long time. I also thought that being content away from Csehy meant denying all the good that was at Csehy. Yet contentment isn’t apathy but choosing Him. It’s not denying the pain or the missing people, but choosing to be joyful where we are. To be content here doesn’t mean that Csehy is nothing now, but that I know where God has placed me is the best place for me.
I was nervous about leaving Csehy early and spending my summer away from Csehy while so many of my favorite people were there having a great time. And yet I had such a clear understanding of where I was supposed to be that it wasn’t that hard to be away, not because I didn’t miss it and everyone there, but because I know that God has a reason for me to be elsewhere right now instead of at Csehy. There was a time where Csehy bore fruit in my life and I bore fruit there, but right now, that fruit-bearing is meant to be happening elsewhere.

I love you all. I want to see every one of you know Him more, know the richness of His Word and of Him – to let Him be what drives you to Csehy, and what keeps you through Post-Csehy depression later – because you are filled by Him, and not by Csehy, and because you know His goodness and His sovereignty to place you where you are, whether it’s at Csehy or away from it.

Beloved brothers and sisters – and those not yet in the fold – may the Lord bless you and keep you. May He make his face shine upon you, and be gracious unto you, and give you peace – true peace, shalom, peace with Him – amen. Seven-fold amen, may it be so in completeness.

Pro Christo,
Kyleigh

2014 Highlights & 2015 Hopes

2014.
moving from Dubai

wedding

{truly one of the best weeks of our lives}

honeymoon in La Paz

Isaac and Michelle being nearby for a few months

meeting Michael Card

pregnancy

Road tripping & traveling – meeting so many of each other’s friends and spending time with family

Getting a new niece AND nephew!

Csehy

moving again!

dates with Ezra, the “best” of which was when we went to The Great Divorce

oboe lessons & birth class

Thanksgiving at our place

so many appointments!

welcoming Miss Munchkin

2015.
some things I hope to do
Nourishing Traditions: soak, ferment, whole, broth
publish an eBook
52 project: photo a week
Bible reading plan
get together more with ladies from church
meditate on the glories of Christ and of heaven (the practical side of the resolution to not fear)
MOVE back across the ocean & sort through/get rid of stuff before we go
cook through (or more through) Jerusalem
work on reeds… if time allows
possibly learn to draw some again

I know it’s going to be a crazy year so I want to keep my focus in the right place, of people over doing things, and even more, of being with God over doing things.

Dear Csehy

Dear Csehy,

I have so many thoughts and words swirling around in my head that I don’t know where to begin. I have so much I want to say – so much thanks, so many memories, so many prayers.
As I write this I have no assurance of ever being at Csehy again. We hope and we dream, and perhaps someday there will be little Dunn staff children while their daddy speaks in chapel or mommy works in the office. Or perhaps in the faraway someday we’ll be head counselors, or be in charge of the Csehy Place. God alone knows who of you I’ll see again on earth, and when that will be. But even while we’re apart, while the pain of being away from such a sweet place is tender in our hearts, we can still encourage one another across the miles, while we must be away for a time.

For seven summers now, Csehy has been a haven for me. It’s been a place where I have grown spiritually, relationally, and musically. I think of the fourteen-year-old me that arrived at Csehy in 2008, shy of everyone and a beginner on the oboe, and how I’ve changed so much since that day. A lot of that is because of Csehy, and how God has used it in my life. There were people that first year, and every year since, who came alongside me and were patient with me – Mr. Stith, Mrs. Rawleigh, and Mrs. Harding especially. There were also people who reached out to make me feel welcome, and even though I was young and inexperienced and awkward, you cared about me and were a friend to me. It took me a while to let some of you do that – but I was missing out. Some of you seemed like giants to me then, and many of you are now good friends.
Now having been an older camper who understands a lot more musically (and who was one of those crazy composition majors – and we’re not incredibly smart, just stressed out and a little insane), I understand you more. To younger campers, we don’t think we’re better than you, and we don’t judge you by your ability. We’ve just had longer to grow. We were once in your shoes, and we haven’t by any means arrived – we have far to go as well. Your musicality or lack thereof doesn’t change our desire to be your friend, to encourage you. We don’t want to be giants to you, but older siblings and friends.

The more I think about it, the more I realize Csehy was a haven to me because of the people I chose to be with. We spoke of and cared about the things of the Lord. We laughed a lot, and I’m sure at times were childish and immature. But the best times were when we had our Bibles open or were talking about the things God had done. It was rich spiritually, and though the musical side of it was good (as was Frisbee), that was what always drew me back. It was what drove every lesson with Mrs. Rawleigh, and often we talked more of God than of music. How ever long I was there for, I could rest from trials of real life and bask in fellowship and teaching.
When I was too old to be a camper any more, I applied to be a counselor in 2013, wanting to invest in others even as I had been invested in by my counselors. And even though I couldn’t be there very long this year (2014) and meet all of you, there’s still much I long to say to everyone who has ever been at Csehy.

My fellows in the bubble, God isn’t just a section of your life or of your summer. At Csehy, we put Him in music and Frisbee, at the start and end of each day. Csehy is a place for friends and fun, but it’s about so much more than that. I rejoiced at how many times what Csehy really is about was driven home: if you’re not right with God, your conductor won’t mind you missing band/orchestra/choir if you’re getting right with Him. He is far more important than the concert. We hear it. We listen. We nod. But for many of you, that’s not your lifestyle at home, or your heart attitude, even at Csehy. You know enough Christian lingo to cover up the state of your heart while you’re at Csehy. You may even have a testimony to share with your hall. But that only makes it worse, because we can only help those who know they’re sick and hurting, even if we can see behind your mask – which we often can. The blank stares during devos or chapel , the meandering through the halls of practice rooms when you should be doing something else, and the way you interact with authority and other campers gives away your heart.
Some of you don’t understand how all-encompassing His word or His call on your life is. I want you to know that. I want you to know that it effects how you treat your parents and your siblings. How you dress (purple isn’t just rules at Csehy. There are matters of the heart behind it!). How you think of and treat the opposite gender. How you move towards marriage someday. How we talk about everything. How your life and salvation is not about you, but about Him – He saved you for His glory more than for your own gain – do you love Him for who He is, or just what He’s done for you? How He is so awesome and great that our every thought and conversation could be on Him and we’d never tire – so why don’t we spend all our time together focused on Him? Why do we deteriorate into surface level friendships when we could have so much?

When we forget Him in what we do, we lose the depth that life can have and Csehy becomes just a place of fun instead of being all it can be. Csehy is a safe place. Joy. Rest. A place to be challenged, equipped, prepared, loved – loving one another as Jesus said to.
That’s why we all find it so hard to leave. Nowhere have I been unconditionally loved by so many, encouraged by so many, or challenged by so many as I have at Csehy. Many of my closest friendships have been made or deepened at Csehy. When we leave, we’re leaving days full of constant fellowship, solid teaching, and fun rooted in love for one another and love for God. The difficulty we have adjusting back to normal life proves how good Csehy is.
And yet, Csehy is a place to be equipped and then be sent out. Last year as all the counselors prepared to leave, Mr. Haynes likened it to a dandelion spreading. We were all together for a time, and then the wind was blowing and we were all being driven to our own places, to be planted there, growing and spreading in the places we live. The Csehy spirit isn’t just for Csehy. It’s something that we can bring everywhere, changing our families, churches, and communities, as we love and encourage people at home like we did at Csehy.

Some of us will be back at Csehy next summer, perhaps full of stories of how God worked through us because of what we learned at Csehy. I’m reminded of the parable of the talents. Csehy is like a talent we’ve been given, and if we go home and all we can think about is being back at Csehy, then we’re burying the talent instead of investing it like the faithful servants did (Matthew 25:14-30).
Some of us are called to keep returning. Others are not. But whichever it is for me, whether that door is closed for ever or for a few years, not being at Csehy doesn’t equate forever goodbyes or forgetting what Csehy was or not ever being with members of that family again. I thought – or rather felt – like it did for a long time. I also thought that being content away from Csehy meant denying all the good that was at Csehy. Yet contentment isn’t apathy but choosing Him. It’s not denying the pain or the missing people, but choosing to be joyful where we are. To be content here doesn’t mean that Csehy is nothing now, but that I know where God has placed me is the best place for me.
I was nervous about leaving Csehy early and spending my summer away from Csehy while so many of my favorite people were there having a great time. And yet I had such a clear understanding of where I was supposed to be that it wasn’t that hard to be away, not because I didn’t miss it and everyone there, but because I know that God has a reason for me to be in San Diego right now instead of at Csehy. There was a time where Csehy bore fruit in my life and I bore fruit there, but right now, that fruit-bearing is meant to be happening elsewhere.

I love you all. I want to see every one of you know Him more, know the richness of His Word and of Him – to let Him be what drives you to Csehy, and what keeps you through Post-Csehy depression later – because you are filled by Him, and not by Csehy, and because you know His goodness and His sovereignty to place you where you are, whether it’s at Csehy or away from it.

Beloved brothers and sisters – and those not yet in the fold – may the Lord bless you and keep you. May He make his face shine upon you, and be gracious unto you, and give you peace – true peace, shalom, peace with Him – amen. Seven-fold amen, may it be so in completeness.

Pro Christo,
Kyleigh

Csehy 2014


I had the privilege of being back at Csehy for Chamberfest 2014. It was an unexpected surprise for me to be able to be back at all, and to be a part of the first ever Chamberfest was incredibly exciting. Chamberfest was very different from “normal” Csehy, the main difference for me being more and different responsibility with fewer counselors there. That meant there were some things that we had to do that we didn’t want to do (being in charge of get to know you games), but it also meant there were things we liked to do that we got to do more often (like mic duty, though that got old after doing it every single day).


{hanging out with Ang and the kids during some of my down time}

Our days were emptier because there were fewer campers, less duties, and because of the nature of Chamberfest (pre-set chamber groups) there weren’t any ensembles for us to play in. And even when we were on duty somewhere (usually the music building) the campers were so aware of times and rehearsals and were serious about their music so they hardly ever needed reminding about what they were supposed to be doing (or not doing). The campers were more limited in where they could be because there weren’t many places we could be with only two of us around most of the time, so that made our lives easier. The difficulty was that we had to be really on top of things because there weren’t other counselors to pick up slack, help us remember things, keep track of time, or go somewhere with a camper.

{thankful for permission from my midwives to play Frisbee}


{since Angela had no campers she’d come join me and mine for devos and serenade my girls to bed}


{Matilda’s first root beer float}

We had a lot more leadership in games and announcements, which was good for me since I prefer to be more in the background.
Most days I was able to play Frisbee and get in lots of down time for practicing, reading and praying, and napping. But it was getting old by Thursday when counselor training started and schedules got more hectic and there was more going on and it felt more like Csehy.

{the whole counseling team}


{Funky Chicken}

The best part was probably devos with my girls, and all my interaction with them in the dorm. They were ready for meals and bed with few reminders and would come to me with questions about clothing and were flexible and usually uncomplaining about schedule changes and boundaries that were unusual. They were open to share during devotions and we had some really good discussions about pride, the pitfalls of being “raised Christian,” and defining terms in 1 Peter 3:18. I think that was due to the smallness of the group, that most of them knew each other beforehand, that they were all more mature instead of a mix, and also that I had grown in learning how to ask questions that lead to discussion instead of just talking. We had more nights of devos than usual, so I hadn’t been completely prepared, and the last few nights the girls wanted to sing together and share testimonies, and we also spent more time in prayer for each other, Csehy, and needs of those around us. There was a lot of sorrow throughout the whole week, with friends and family both of Csehy and people at Csehy suffering and dying (and then one of the faculty read from Revelation about no more tears and Him wiping away every tear and it was so perfect and beautiful and joyous).
And then on Saturday night we sang loud and crazy songs and then had a pillow fight.
It was amazing to me to see how God had worked in them since the previous year and how He was at work in that week.

We still made it to the Field of Dreams three nights, complete with midnight runs, shooting stars, and lying in the wet grass. I got to know Lauren and Mrs. Hayes better and Angela, Jonathan, and I had lots of good times together before the other counselors came and I enjoyed getting to know the new counselors better as well as spend time with those I already knew well, even though it was way less time than we’d had last year. I spent the last night in Hannah’s room and then she and Jonathan took me to the airport, so we were able to have some good talking time after not seeing each other for so long.

Leaving was both harder and easier this year. It was harder because I was so much closer to my girls this year and because this time I really have no idea when I’ll be back. Last year there was at least a slight chance that I’d be back in 2014. But it was easier because I wasn’t there for as long, and because I knew I didn’t have the strength to do all four weeks, and because it was so much clearer in my mind where I was supposed to be and I missed Ezra so much. But like last year, goodbyes were very sad and then I went into the airport feeling fine but as soon as I got past security the reality hit. I think it’s because check-in and lines and documents take up so much of your mind and then you get to your gate and realize you’re alone. But I know from last year that loving others even when it means goodbyes and separations is so worth it.
And even though there were tears, the pain was less not because I loved less but because i know more of God and His sovereignty and also the love we all have for each other.

All of the days were wonderful and ones I want to remember, but Friday was one of those days that you want to treasure forever: meditations on Isaiah 43 – an oboe lesson – long call to Ezra – surprising campers: serenading & funky chicken – beautiful weather – baby moving – picnics – laughter – great Frisbee – a time with my girls too special for words – playing with little kids – teasing – the stars & Isaiah 40.

Someday I hope we’ll be back, and together, though it may only be for visits and those may be few and far between. But I’m so thankful for the time I have had at Csehy, its influence on my music, the friendships forged there, and the strength it has given to my relationship with God. Even as times change and situations at Csehy are different, I do know that it’s a place God has greatly blessed and used and it’s been a privilege to be a part of the ministry that goes on there.

 

{some photo credit goes to Csehy}

looking back: 2013

just a few words and photos on 2013.

Midnight thoughts: last stars of 2013\don’t want to say goodbye to this year\”everything has got to end sometime. Otherwise nothing would ever get started”\first stars of 2014\I get married this year {sometime I’m going to go to bed in one year and wake up in another – the closest I’ll ever get to time travel}

Worship changed a lot for me. It’s become much easier to be delighted in God, especially in little daily things like clouds or stars, because I’ve come to see His hand in everything, and remember that everything comes from Him. Worship isn’t just praising Him but also beholding Him. And I think with that has come what I want my life to be about. I want to behold God, and want to help others behold Him, to see how great and awesome God is, not only in how He saves us but also in other areas, like how He orders creation.

All that thrills my soul is Jesus,
He is more than life to me,
And the fairest of ten thousand
In my blessed Lord I see!

Music also changed a lot. Throughout the year there were lots of mini-revolutions in the way I think about practice, technique, and music in general. Practicing slower to always practice it right. Using technique to get out of the way so the music speaks. Music showing the culture of its time. How music should be different for Christian musicians, in how we practice and perform and use it to communicate.

I realized how much this introvert really loves people, and also how much I am loved, and how worthwhile relationships are. This was made clear in both family and friends. With all the wedding and moving deadlines and other things I wanted to get done, whether it was practicing or otherwise, I was always reminding myself that people were so much more important, and because of that life was so much richer. And then watching the most recent Doctor Who episode, and watching others go through change and goodbyes and thinking about all the people the Doctor loves and helps and then has to leave behind – and some really profound quotes and thoughts and faces and feelings as I was thinking about change and goodbyes and all that {more on this coming}.

Marriage just around the corner, and wedding planning taking up time, energy, and creativity, but it was mostly enjoyable. And in just a few days, I’ll be married to Ezra, and we’ll start life together. I can’t wait!

Highlights of 2013
going to the US in April to visit Ezra and do wedding planning, have special cousin and mom time.

Csehy. That’s almost all I’ll say about it because I’ve said so much elsewhere and the words and highlights of Csehy overwhelm. But it sparked the musical and worship revolutions and also began the realizing of how much I love people and how much I am loved by people.


The trip Hannah and I took to RAK, two really special days with my friend of many years who’s like a twin sister.

seeing Sarah T. in Hong Kong

desert trips

Fontgoneano escapades

lessons and fellowship with Sarah M. (and baby Isabelle!)

the lovely shower the C’s and M’s hosted for me

playing music with DCO, NSO, DWB, and singing with the Dubai Singers.

last visit to the W’s.

snow mountain with my dad’s family}

stargazing & cloud chasing

playing volleyball

hospitality –all the varied and wonderful people we had in our home and who had me in theirs

Well Group

piano teaching

Nate getting Eagle

travels: Greece & Lyons, Bahrain & US

times with Cait, Joel, and Jacqueline

And 2014?
Getting married is the big one! So is moving across the ocean and starting a new life. And new stories and compositions and ensembles and people to love and foods to cook and thoughts for the blog {big ones coming after the wedding}.

Happy New Year!

Favorite Hymns: 37-48

The third installment, with links to the first two.


Hymn #37: Rock of Ages

Also this tune.

Not the labors of my hands
can fulfill thy law’s commands;
could my zeal no respite know,
could my tears forever flow,
all for sin could not atone;
thou must save, and thou alone.

Nothing in my hand I bring,
simply to the cross I cling;
naked, come to thee for dress;
helpless, look to thee for grace;
foul, I to the fountain fly;
wash me, Savior, or I die.

While I draw this fleeting breath,
when mine eyes shall close in death,
when I soar to worlds unknown,
see thee on thy judgment throne,
Rock of Ages, cleft for me,
let me hide myself in thee.
{hidden in Thee lest I perish seeing Thy face}

Hymn #38: Stricken, Smitten, and Afflicted

Favorite verse:
Here we have a firm foundation;
Here the refuge of the lost;
Christ, the Rock of our salvation,
His the name of which we boast.
Lamb of God, for sinners wounded,
Sacrifice to cancel guilt!
None shall ever be confounded
Who on Him their hope have built.

Hymn #39: Here is Love
{forgot this one earlier!}

Favorite verse:
On the mount of crucifixion,
Fountains opened deep and wide;
Through the floodgates of God’s mercy
Flowed a vast and gracious tide.
Grace and love, like mighty rivers,
Poured incessant from above,
And Heav’n’s peace and perfect justice
Kissed a guilty world in love.

Hymn #40: The Cross Still Stands
{written off of a prayer from The Valley of Vision}

Lord, this glory-seeking hunger tries
To pull my heart from You:
Such a dark, unwelcome guest who hides
In everything I do.
But Your grace remains and pleads for me:
“Destroy this enemy!”
For the cross still stands
And meets my deepest need.

Hymn #41: The King of Love my Shepherd Is

Favorite verse:
Perverse and foolish I have strayed,
But yet in love he sought me,
And on his shoulder gently laid,
And home, rejoicing, brought me.

Hymn #42: The Lord Bless You and Keep You
{because no list of favorite hymns would be complete without the Csehy Benediction}

Hymn #43: The Lord’s My Shepherd

Favorite verse:
Yea, though I walk in death’s dark vale,
Yet will I fear none ill;
For Thou art with me; and Thy rod
And staff me comfort still.

{and the one I grew up with}

Hymn #44: When Morning Gilds the Sky

favorite verse:
The night becomes as day
When from the heart we say:
May Jesus Christ be praised!
The pow’rs of darkness fear
When this sweet chant they hear:
May Jesus Christ be praised!

Hymn #47: Wonderful Grace of Jesus
{some numbers I accidentally did twice… so we’re at 47 of 48!}

Favorite verse:
Wonderful grace of Jesus, reaching the most defiled,
By its transforming power, making him God’s dear child.
Purchasing peace and heaven for all eternity;
And the wonderful grace of Jesus reaches me!

Hymn #48: This is My Father’s World

Favorite verse:
This is my Father’s world
O let me ne’er forget –
That though the wrong seems oft so strong,
God is the ruler yet.
This is my Father’s world,
The battle is not done,
Jesus who died shall be satisfied,
And earth and heav’n be one.

And I keep trying to think of something to say about this recording, or how to say it best. I didn’t even look for another one; I knew right away which recording I would use for this hymn, even though there aren’t vocals, there’s only one I ever listen to.
I waited two days to post this one – I was going to on November 30 but then when I was looking for the recording I realized it was so close to December 2 and knew I had to wait, especially when I burst into tears when I started listening to the recording. It’s hard to believe it’s been two years since Dr. Hsu died. We all still miss him, even people like me who didn’t know him very well. But we are all so jealous of him, longing to be with the Lord as he is.